Found Compressions One and Two

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Found Compressions One and Two

Found Compressions One and Two

Compressed mixed plastics bale and film bale, cellophane_80” x 53” x 51”_Public installation_2013-14

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 Found Compressions One and Two was a site-specific sculpture consisting of two cellophane-wrapped bales of compacted mixed and film plastics. The bales were found objects produced by collaborator Loraas Recycle, the contents of which were sourced from Saskatchewan and processed in Saskatoon - a relatively new public service in 2013.  The work was accompanied by a blog that served as an online public forum for and about the project, which provided a biographical snapshot of the employees of Loraas who sort Saskatoon’s recycling. Found Compressions One and Two had a controversial 'second life' when, after a long Canadian winter, it emerged from the snow weather-beaten, like other waste materials do.  The work received local, national, and international press for its politically-fraught content and general lack of visual appeal, and continues to provoke dialogues around public art, waste, and aesthetics. 

Found Compressions One and Two was a site-specific sculpture consisting of two cellophane-wrapped bales of compacted mixed and film plastics. The bales were found objects produced by collaborator Loraas Recycle, the contents of which were sourced from Saskatchewan and processed in Saskatoon - a relatively new public service in 2013.  The work was accompanied by a blog that served as an online public forum for and about the project, which provided a biographical snapshot of the employees of Loraas who sort Saskatoon’s recycling. Found Compressions One and Two had a controversial 'second life' when, after a long Canadian winter, it emerged from the snow weather-beaten, like other waste materials do.  The work received local, national, and international press for its politically-fraught content and general lack of visual appeal, and continues to provoke dialogues around public art, waste, and aesthetics.