Everything Must Go_Small.gif
Everything Must Go.jpg
Everything Must Go

Everything Must Go

Glow sticks, zip ties, laser-cut acrylic, hardware_16” x 32” x 6”_2016

Always Fresh.jpg
Always Fresh

Always Fresh

Glow sticks, zip ties, laser-cut acrylic, hardware_24” x 30” x 6” _2015

Pay Later.jpg
Pay Later

Pay Later

Glow sticks, zip ties, laser-cut acrylic, hardware_24” x 30” x 6” _2015

Black Friday.jpg
Black Friday

Black Friday

Glow sticks, zip ties, laser-cut acrylic, hardware_24” x 30” x 6” _2016

Glow Stick Neons use single-use, chemiluminescent glow sticks as a trompe l’oiel for commercial neons commonly used in contemporary art.  First appropriated by early Conceptualists like Joseph Kosuth and Bruce Nauman, neons have now become a staple in the contemporary museum. Since the glow sticks in Glow Stick Neons are single-use, they can only be shown once in their 'lit' form. After the effect of the temporary glow is spent, they are displayed 'dead' from then onward.

Habit's Fine Dust Chokes Us

Habit's Fine Dust Chokes Us

Glow sticks, reclaimed painting (stripped/repainted), waste latex_48” x 2.5” x 36”_2017

Habit’s Fine Dust Chokes Us is made from a reclaimed painting, waste latex, and found glow sticks that act as a trompe l’oiel for commercial neons commonly used in contemporary art. First appropriated as an ironic commercial critique by artists like Joseph Kosuth and Bruce Nauman, neons have now become a staple in the contemporary museum. The trashed glow sticks for these this larger series, called Glow Stick Neons, have already lost their glow and are displayed “dead.” The written content of this piece is derived from Marge Piercy’s poem, “A key to common lethal fungi.”

Habit's Fine Dust_Installation 02.jpg
Habit's Fine Dust_Detail.jpg